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Search Results for: opah

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Opah Top Loin Fillet

Also known as moonfish, opah (Lampris guttatus) is an exceptional tasting fish with good fat content. It provides multiple cuts that range in color from very light pearl pink to deep dark red. Both in flavor and texture, some cuts are what you would expect of a dense fish, while others could easily stand in for beef.

Typically cut from the tender top loin of the fish, opah fillet presents light salmon-orange to pink-rose in color. Its lean texture and distinct yet mild, sweet flavor fall somewhere between tuna and swordfish. And similar to both species, its dense meat turns white when cooked. If you’ve never eaten opah fillet, this is an absolute must-try. Feel free to bake, broil, grill, pan sear or poach for outstanding results!

Sustainability

We work directly with U.S. fishermen who offload opah in San Diego. U.S. opah is rated a “Good Alternative” by Seafood Watch. We may also receive opah from Mexico, whose fishery is currently unrated. Opah have been caught incidentally by Pacific longline fisheries for years. Because they don’t swim in schools, they are typically caught one at a time. Fishermen once thought that this unusually colorful fish brought good luck, and would give it away as a goodwill gesture rather than sell it. There also wasn’t much of a market for it. In the late 1980s, the state of Hawaii started promoting opah to build a market among U.S. consumers for this underutilized species. Today, opah’s tasty and versatile meat is in high demand, particularly among restaurants and chefs.

Watch Tommy the Fishmonger break down a whole opah:

Also known as moonfish, opah (Lampris guttatus) is an exceptional tasting fish with good fat content. It provides multiple cuts that range in color from very light pearl pink to deep dark red. Both in flavor and texture, some cuts are what you would expect of a dense fish, while others could easily stand in for beef.

Typically cut from the tender top loin of the fish, opah fillet presents light salmon-orange to pink-rose in color. Its lean texture and distinct yet mild, sweet flavor fall somewhere between tuna and swordfish. And similar to both species, its dense meat turns white when cooked. If you’ve never eaten opah fillet, this is an absolute must-try. Feel free to bake, broil, grill, pan sear or poach for outstanding results!

Sustainability

We work directly with U.S. fishermen who offload opah in San Diego. U.S. opah is rated a “Good Alternative” by Seafood Watch. We may also receive opah from Mexico, whose fishery is currently unrrated. Opah have been caught incidentally by Pacific longline fisheries for years. Because they don’t swim in schools, they are typically caught one at a time. Fishermen once thought that this unusually colorful fish brought good luck, and would give it away as a goodwill gesture rather than sell it. There also wasn’t much of a market for it. In the late 1980s, the state of Hawaii started promoting opah to build a market among U.S. consumers for this underutilized species. Today, opah’s tasty and versatile meat is in high demand, particularly among restaurants and chefs.

Recipe photo opah meatballs fishery opt e1563935767248

Opah Meatballs

A deep sea twist on traditional meatballs! Serve this with your favorite tomato sauce as an appetizer, or add pasta to make it the main course. This utilizes opah “flank” which is derived from the abductor or adductor muscle of the fish and looks and cooks similar to beef. Makes 18 meatballs. Recipe courtesy Chef Paul Arias, The Fishery. …

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Pan seared opah top loin plated IMG 0910 scaled 1

Pan Seared Opah Fillet

Simply seasoned and quick to cook, this recipe is one you can use time and again on many different fish. For this we used opah fillet. Typically cut from the tender top loin of the opah, it offers a lean yet moist texture and distinct yet mild, sweet flavor. Some people describe its culinary qualities as between …

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Ground fish lettuce wrap 2

Easy Ground Opah Lettuce Wraps

For a quick and healthy meal, try this twist on traditional lettuce wraps! Photo and recipe by Catalina Offshore Products (adapted from Lee Kum Kim). Serves 2-4. Ingredients: 1lb ground opah abductor/adductor meat (can also use ground tuna) 8 oz water chestnuts, drained and chopped 4 green onions, chopped 1/4 cup roasted peanuts, chopped 1 carrot, chopped 1 …

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Opah corned beef hash 2.1 e1552330351452

Opah Corned “Beef” Hash

As featured on Fox 5 San Diego, this pescatarian twist on traditional corned beef hash, this crowd-pleasing recipe utilizes opah flank. Otherwise referred to as the abductor and adductor muscles of the fish, located near the the fin, opah flank nearly looks and cooks like beef but is leaner and far healthier. Recipe created for Catalina Offshore …

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Recipe photo Opah Ceviche Hector Cassanova e1563897727863

Baja-Style Opah Ceviche

Beloved throughout Baja and Southern California, ceviche is a Latin-American dish made with raw fish cured in citrus juice such as lemon or lime. Classic recipes typically call for a firm white fish but this uniquely San Diego version features opah. Serve as an appetizer with tortilla chips or on tostada shells! Recipe created for …

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Recipe photo Opah Birria Street Tacos Miguel Valdez

Opah Birria Street Tacos

Classic birria is usually made with goat’s meat or even with lamb or a combination of several types of meat. This seafood twist features a lean cut of opah that looks and cooks similar to beef! Makes 16 regular tacos or 32 street tacos. Recipe created for Catalina Offshore by Miguel Valdez of Liberty Call Distilling. Ingredients: …

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