Open Blue Cobia Makes its Way to Catalina Offshore

By Rebecca Gardon

Open Blue CobiaAsk folks what a cobia looks like and you’re likely to get one of two responses: Shark? Catfish? Then ask folks what cobia tastes like. It’s likely to be described as a cross between swordfish and Chilean seabass, or sturgeon and hamachi. One thing we know for sure? Cobia is a delicious fish that lends itself to a wide variety of culinary applications, both raw and cooked.

Recently we added sashimi grade Open Blue Cobia to our portfolio of high-quality, responsibly farmed seafood. Wild cobia is a species native to mid-Atlantic and Indo-Pacific waters. The tasty fish are fast-growing and get quite large, making them a favorite catch among sport fishermen. What makes them difficult to catch on a commercial level is the fact that they don’t school. This is where aquaculture comes in.

Open Blue Cobia are raised six miles offshore on the Caribbean Ocean in Panama by Open Blue, the largest open ocean farm in the world. Open Blue operates at the forefront of the seafood industry with a state-of-the-art deep ocean mariculture platform supported by advanced hatchery and processing facilities. Here, fish receive a continuous flow of oxygen. The nets used never touch the ocean floor. No cumulative impurities are in the water column or in the bottom, and there is minimal to neutral impact on the ocean environment. Fish are free of contaminants, pesticides and hormones. Importantly, Open Blue Cobia are fully traceable from egg to plate.

The result of Open Blue’s commitment to sustainability is a premium quality product. Open Blue Cobia is high in protein, boasting 2x the amount of Omega 3 as the average salmon. The superior, sashimi grade, white meat indeed combines the dense texture of swordfish with a high oil content similar to hamachi. It is rich and buttery, with a mild to medium slightly sweet flavor all its own. Enjoy this fish raw in sushi or as sashimi. Use it in your favorite ceviche or crudo recipe. Or, grill, broil, bake or sear it, and take comfort in knowing cobia is nearly impossible to overcook. (It’s true!)

We love the taste and texture of this fish and think it’s a definite must-try for those who are unfamiliar. To learn more about Open Blue Cobia, check out this article in National Geographic or visit OpenBlue.com.

 

Blackened cobia Cobia crudo Cobia_cooked

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